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The Boys Are Back In Town- David Young- Stasi Wolf/ Steve Cavanagh- The Liar/ David Jackson- Hope To Die

East Germany, 1975. Karin Müller, sidelined from the murder squad in Berlin, jumps at the chance to be sent south to Halle-Neustadt, where a pair of infant twins have gone missing.

But Müller soon finds her problems have followed her. Halle-Neustadt is a new town – the pride of the communist state – and she and her team are forbidden by the Stasi from publicising the disappearances, lest they tarnish the town’s flawless image.

Meanwhile, in the eerily nameless streets and tower blocks, a child snatcher lurks, and the clock is ticking to rescue the twins alive . . .

Having absolutely loved David Young’s debut, Stasi Child with it’s refreshingly different setting, and being steeped in the history of Germany’s former divisions, both geographically and socially, here’s the next in the series. Once again the indomitable Karin Müller finds herself enmeshed in a thorny and deeply personal investigation, under the watchful eye of the Stasi…

What I have loved about both books is Young’s attention to detail, that so firmly roots the reader in this timeframe, allowing us to bear witness to the unique and sinister workings of this totalitarian state. Unlike other authors who fail to balance their reams of research with good solid storytelling, Young consistently displays a knack for both, whether describing the functional architecture of Halle-Neustadt, where Müller is stationed, to further adroit observations on the social stratum that exists behind its concrete façade. He effortlessly melds the constraints of life in the east, with references to the forbidden fruits that lie within the west, and the frustrations that Müller and her cohorts face in the course of their investigation . I really liked the use of the dual narrative, that slowly binds the story together, the revelatory impact on Müller’s case. and the grim revelations about certain medical practices in this closed state.

In terms of characterisation, not only does Müller have to navigate the suffocating constraints of state control, which the book excels at,  but there is a slight shift in tone, as Young begins to fill out Müller’s own character more, affording some interesting insights into her family history. At times I felt, this development of Muller’s character was weighted too heavily against the main plot, giving the book a slight imbalance, and there was one twist in the plot that felt a little too contrived for this reader, leading to the feeling that this was a bridging book to greater revelations ahead, instead of a naturally fluid development of the series. However, I enjoyed the way that once again, Young carefully uses Müller’s colleagues to lighten the tone, and adds a much needed softening to the personalities that lie beneath their constricted professional lives.

To be honest though, this one small criticism of Müller’s character development within Stasi Wolf  did little to dent my enjoyment overall. Young’s astute and compelling use of his chosen location and period of history was as enlightening and educational as ever, within the arc of this dark and disturbing investigation. Recommended.

(With thanks to Bonnier Zaffre for the ARC)

WHO IS DEADLIER …

Leonard Howell’s worst nightmare has come true: his daughter Caroline has been kidnapped. Not content with relying on the cops, Howell calls the only man he trusts to get her back.

… THE MAN WHO KNOWS THE TRUTH …

Eddie Flynn knows what it’s like to lose a daughter and vows to bring Caroline home safe. Once a con artist, now a hotshot criminal attorney, Flynn is no stranger to the shady New York underworld.

… OR THE ONE WHO BELIEVES A LIE?

However, as he steps back into his old life, Flynn realizes that the rules of game have changed – and that he is being played. But who is pulling the strings? And is anyone in this twisted case telling the truth…?

Having reviewed Steve Cavanagh’s two excellent previous Eddie Flynn thrillers, The Defence and The Plea  it is with some pleasure that I can say that the big guy has come up trumps again. Having converted me to the enjoyable world of the legal thriller, Cavanagh plunges his stalwart Flynn back into a compelling tale of kidnap and twisted family secrets…

The sharp-talking, quick thinking and utterly engaging character of Eddie Flynn lies at the heart of the success of this America based series to date. He is an entirely likeable protagonist who easily gets the reader on board with his delightful mix of street smarts and, at times, emotional sensitivity. I love the little echoes of his grifter past that undercut his talents as a lawyer, and the interludes of wit that Cavanagh employs in this incredibly fast paced and engaging thriller. Cavanagh’s writing is extremely fluid and well-paced throughout, with an uncanny knack in his control of tension and action, from the high-stakes shenanigans of Flynn’s courtroom appearances, to his clear-sighted and unquestioning mission for justice for his client.

So as not to spoil your enjoyment of this thriller, I will dwell fleetingly on the plot, as there are more than a few twists and turns and surprising revelations in the course of Flynn’s thorny case. What I would say is that there is a proper ass-kicking female FBI agent in this one, who more than deserves a repeat appearance in future books (hint, hint) and a grim tale of dark jealousies that exist between siblings that could only end badly. It is never less than gripping throughout, and Flynn needs his wits about him to navigate this minefield of tricky legal negotiations, and intermittent flashpoints of danger…

All in all, The Liar proves itself an extremely enjoyable, well-plotted thriller with solid characterisation, and a nice sting in the tale. A great addition to an already mustn’t miss series. Loved it.

(With thanks to Orion for the ARC)

On a bitterly cold winter’s night, Liverpool is left stunned by a brutal murder in the grounds of the city’s Anglican Cathedral. A killer is on the loose, driven by a chilling rage. Put on the case, DS Nathan Cody is quickly stumped. Wherever he digs, the victim seems to be almost angelic – no-one has a bad word to say, let alone a motive for such a violent murder. And Cody has other things on his mind too. The ghosts of his past are coming ever closer, and – still bearing the physical and mental scars – it’s all he can do to hold onto his sanity.
And then the killer strikes again . . .

Hope To Die is the second outing for DS Nathan Cody, and the follow up to A Tapping At My Door the first of David Jackson’s new Liverpool based series. Still reeling from the events of the first book, our beleaguered detective has more demons to face in this dark and testing investigation…

Aside from the triple murder case, the book is punctuated by the experiences of a young boy suffering abuse, in this case at the hands of a religiously zealous and cruel mother, and the mental angst of DS Cody himself in the grip of the reverberations of a previous violent interlude in his police career. Jackson largely succeeds at juggling these three strands of narrative, but maybe too consciously is setting the scene for a further book in the series in the case of Cody’s torment. I felt early on that the demons haunting him would not be effectively dealt with this in this book, so resigned myself to a possible cliffhanger for this particular story arc, but no matter as the murder investigations he is involved in provided more than enough tension in the main storyline. I thought the plotting and eventual resolution of the murder cases was extremely well done, with a cunningly concealed, but utterly believable perpetrator, and I enjoyed both the build up to,  and the final unmasking of, the killer. Jackson makes liberal use of red herrings and blind alleys, and I always think this adds something to the reading of a thriller, testing out our little grey cells, and playing with our intuition. I also greatly enjoyed the sideswipes at religious fervour and hypocrisy that are central to the murderer’s motivations.

Something that is always consistent in Jackson’s writing, be it his former New York set crime series, or this one, is his solid characterisation, and the interaction between his characters. There is ready Scouse wit, emotional angst, spikiness, and total professionalism in equal measure, and he never shies away from homing in on this little mis-steps in communication that exist when people have to react with others outside of their professional zone. This is particularly evident in the torturous and frustrating relationship between Cody and DC Megan Webley, whose emotional back and forth, provides a nice little distraction from the grim murder investigation, but not to the detriment of the central plot. More a case of will they again, won’t they again, knock their heads together, throw hands up in despair etc…

Hope To Die proves itself another well-executed police procedural from David Jackson, and as another step in the confronting of Cody’s ghosts from the past, acts as a good bridge in readiness for the next in the series. I’m looking forward to it already…

(With thanks to Bonnier Zaffre for the ARC)

 

 

#BlogTour- Imran Mahmood- You Don’t Know Me

An unnamed defendant stands accused of murder. Just before the Closing Speeches, the young man sacks his lawyer, and decides to give his own defence speech.

He tells us that his barrister told him to leave some things out. Sometimes, the truth can be too difficult to explain, or believe. But he thinks that if he’s going to go down for life, he might as well go down telling the truth.

There are eight pieces of evidence against him. As he talks us through them one by one, his life is in our hands. We, the reader – member of the jury – must keep an open mind till we hear the end of his story. His defence raises many questions, but at the end of the speeches, only one matters…

Penned by criminal defence barrister Imran Mahmood, You Don’t Know Me, provides a refreshingly different take on the legal thriller genre, challenging the reader, and manipulating our empathy throughout as we listen to the voice of one young man on trial for murder.

The use of the first person narration throughout will admittedly be not to everyone’s taste, as some readers have a real aversion to this narrative structure. However, as the book is structured as a young man giving his own testimony, seeking to win over judge and jury alike, I rather liked the intensely personal nature of this device, and the fact that this leads you to be totally engaged with the unnamed defendant’s lengthy closing statement. By not naming the young man directly, and having every experience of his filtered through his own particular viewpoint, cleverly we actually see more the manipulation of others, the inherent stupidity of his actions and his misguided loyalty through his own damning testimony. The first person narrative, however, is not without problems as sustaining this over 370 pages, leads to a wavering between erudition and rambling, so there were some periods where my attention did falter, unlike in slimmer novels that use the same narrative technique.

Sometimes in order to prove the intelligence and self awareness of the unnamed defendant his language seemed to diversify at times from the street smart vernacular that was more in evidence at the start of the book to a heightened sensibility of his predicament that seemed slightly at odds with the initial perception we have of him as a character. However, I fully appreciate the fact that if the narrative was crammed with repetitive vernacular the lengthy page count would have been inherently more irritating. So, for the most part the sheer conviction and determination of his testimony kept me engaged, as I was drawn into the violent miasma of his day to day life and experiences.

Although, we only experience other characters in the book through this one person testimony, the characterisation throughout shone with clarity. His cohorts of Curt and Ki added a richness and texture to the story, and between them brought out the strengths and fatal weaknesses of our narrator, as they became inextricably bound together as they strive to overcome what seems like a hopeless fait accompli. There is also an unremitting and authentic portrayal of their desire to extricate themselves from their shared experiences in the deprived area they inhabit, and the level of loyalty they display to each other, though clearly being subject to the manipulation and malevolence of others throughout.

To be fair, I admired this interesting and fairly audacious debut in the fact that Mahmood takes a risk with the narrative and structure. I thought that for the most part it gave a realistic portrayal of the lives of its characters, although for me personally the jury is still out so to speak on the final revelation of our narrator’s testimony, but still worth a recommendation for the bravery of its intention.

(With thanks to Penguin for the ARC)

 

Catch up with or continue to follow the blog tour at these excellent sites:

May 2016 Round-Up and Raven’s Book of the Month

_DSC0185 (Common Raven)Words cannot express how much I have enjoyed the month of May with a whole two weeks off work, a brilliant trip to the CrimeFest crime writing convention and some jolly good reading too! Had an absolute blast at CrimeFest (superbly organised by Myles, Donna and Adrian *round of applause*) where I attended 18 panels, saw Ian Rankin brilliantly interviewed by Jake Kerridge, and discovered a whole host of new and exciting crime authors through the Fresh Blood sessions. Thanks to all the authors for their wit, intelligence and truly entertaining panels, and for their general good-natured bonhomie in the face of their adoring fans. Lovely to see my favourites again! I would also like to give a special mention to all the authors and publicists who bombarded me with praise for my reviews. I would say that you guys do all the hard work- I am a mere conduit- but thank you, I appreciate it very much. I met a whole host of wonderful people including the blogging posse, Liz, Christine, Victoria, Lisa,  Shaz and Tracey,  where it was lovely to put faces to Twitter handles- you are excellent people- and fab to catch up with some familiar faces from the blogging community too- interesting discussions guys!  As usual there were also late night shenanigans, near the knuckle tales and drunken high jinx- but alas my beak is sealed. Sorry… Can’t wait for next year…

May has been an excellent month in terms of volume of books read, but have let it slide it bit with actually writing reviews. Consequently, there is a small pile of books nestling by the laptop, waiting for their moment in the sun. Their time will come. June will hopefully then be a bumper round-up and with another two blog tours on the horizon, there’s lots of criminal goodies to bring you next month. Have a good one!

Books read and reviewed:

Abir Mukherjee- A Rising Man

J M Gulvin- The Long Count

Steve Cavanagh- The Plea

William Shaw- The Birdwatcher

Tetsuya Honda- The Silent Dead

 

Raven’s Book of The Month:

This month I could easily say all of them! It’s a rare occurrence to love every single book you’ve read, but you wouldn’t go far wrong picking any of these at random, depending on your mood or preferred location. Add them all to your summer reading list. But, having to adhere to my self-imposed convention, I’m choosing the one that really struck an emotional chord with me, with its sublime mix of location, shifting timeline, an appreciation of the natural world, and faultless characterisation. Step forward…

images1

 

 

Blog Tour- Steve Cavanagh- #ThePlea (Eddie Flynn 2)

the-plea

When David Child, a major client of a corrupt New York law firm, is arrested for murder, the FBI ask con-artist-turned-lawyer Eddie Flynn to secure Child as his client and force him to testify against the firm. Eddie’s not a man to be coerced into representing a guilty client, but the FBI have incriminating files on Eddie’s wife, and if Eddie won’t play ball, she’ll pay the price. When Eddie meets Child he’s convinced the man is innocent, despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary. With the FBI putting pressure on him to secure the plea, Eddie must find a way to prove Child’s innocence while keeping his wife out of danger – not just from the FBI, but from the firm itself…

The opening of my review for Steve Cavanagh’s first book, The Defence was a general moan-fest about my own personal aversion to legal thrillers, which was turned on its head completely by how much I loved this debut. Admittedly I’ve not picked up another legal thriller since, as I have been saving myself, metaphorically speaking, for this one, the next outing for a certain shady lawyer by the name of Mr Eddie Flynn…

Once again our smart talking, quick witted and fast thinking lawyer Flynn is again in a whole heap of trouble, reluctantly coerced into defending a rich, timid techno geek on a trumped up murder charge, and seeking to bring down a powerful and inherently corrupt law firm, with his wife’s liberty hanging in the balance. That is the seemingly simple premise of what turns out to be a meticulously plotted, exciting, and chew-your-fingernails-down-to-the-quick thriller, with more twists in the tale, and moments of jaw dropping tension that you can possibly imagine. A late night of reading beckons my friends. Cavanagh’s control and pace of each strand and curve in the plot is meticulous in its execution, leading the reader to find it incredibly difficult to find a natural break in the book to attend the other small matters of life, work and family. To sustain the amount of tension and some real high octane moments of not an inconsiderable page count is further testament to the skill of Cavanagh’s writing. The story pivots effortlessly from the taut courtroom scenes to the violent episodes that occur in Flynn’s out of court investigation to clear Child’s name and to bring down the sinister and corrupt law firm of Harlan and Sinton, with the overbearing pressure of government agents seeking to dictate his every move. The dialogue is crisp, sharp and precise throughout, working perfectly in tandem with the tension of the book overall.

The characterisation is terrific throughout, aside from the slightly rumpled but always on the ball Flynn, drawing on his family heritage of con artists to bob and weave his way through what seems an impossible task, to his stalwart accomplice the sinister Lizard, and his innocent and all-at-sea client David Child with his limited social skills but razor sharp brain. Set against the ‘goodies’ are a splendid crew of baddies (cue pantomime hissing) and a few characters that turn out to be a marvellous mix of both. As much as Flynn adroitly displays his legal largesse, the devilish machinations of the aforementioned thwart his every move, leading to tense car chases, physical violence and more moments of peril than you can shake the proverbial stick at. Another enjoyable element of the book is the way that Cavanagh can both inform and entertain the reader through the perplexing world of the American justice system through Flynn’s courtroom face offs with the odious District Attorney Zader. and this makes for some excellent snippy exchanges, and the battle of legal intellects.

Admittedly there are a few  plot contrivances to drive the action forward that require a wee bit of suspension of disbelief, but this is just a real put-up-your-feet and enjoy the ride thriller. Go with it, and make time in your summer reading for this little corker. Highly recommended.

 

Steve Cavanagh was born and raised in Belfast and is a practicing lawyer and holds a certificate in Advanced Advocacy. He is married with two young children. The Defence, has been chosen as one of Amazon’s great debuts for 2015, as part of their Amazon Rising Stars programme. In 2015 Steve received the ACES award for Literature from the Northern Ireland Arts Council. The Defence was longlisted for the Crime Writer’s Association Ian Fleming Steel Dagger, and shortlisted for two Dead Good Readers Awards.  Steve writes fast-paced legal thrillers set in New York City featuring series character Eddie Flynn. The Defence is his first novel. The Plea is published 19.5.16. Visit the author’s website  here or follow  on Twitter @SSCav

(With thanks to Orion for the ARC)

 

Blog Tour- Neil White- The Death Collector- Extract

51lPwPqpFWL__SX323_BO1,204,203,200_Welcome to the next stop on the Neil White blog tour to promote the hardback release of White’s new thriller The Domino Killer, and the recent release of The Death Collector in paperback. If White is going to be a new discovery for you, I think you’re going to like this one, and courtesy of the dedicated Liz Loves Books a highly intriguing extract follows…

Joe Parker is Manchester’s top criminal defence lawyer and Sam Parker – his brother – is a brilliant detective with the Greater Manchester Police force. Together they must solve a puzzling case that is chilling Manchester to the bone. The Death Collector is charming, sophisticated and intelligent, but he likes to dominate women, to make them give themselves to him completely; to surrender their dignity and their lives. He’s a collector of beautiful things, so once he traps them he’ll never let them go. Joe is drawn into the Death Collector’s world and when the case becomes dangerous, Sam is the first person he turns to. In this gripping thriller, danger lurks for not only the Parker brothers, but also those closest to them….

EXTRACT

It was the comedown he hated.

The fire had maintained him through the night, kept loaded with coal to keep their heat and make it intimate, the flames casting moving shadows as they lay together. One last time.

His head was against her breast, his arm across her, keeping her close. He remembered their times together, those nights in his car in secluded lanes, or reaching for her hand in quiet restaurants far away from home so that no one would see them. Their secret, close and intense.

He opened his eyes and the scene had altered somehow. Gone was the warmth of before. The flames were dying down and the mood was different. Now it felt empty.

Things had changed. The police had been outside earlier and someone had been at his window. That changed everything. It could be the end. How did he feel about that? He searched his mind for that gentle flicker of fear, but there was nothing. Just an acceptance. He had always known it was coming. The end.

He raised himself up on his elbows and looked at the fire. It kept him warm but it cheated him too. The heat would make her stiffen up too quickly, the rigor mortis setting in before the full rush of sunrise. All of a sudden she would feel alien and unreal against his skin.

He clenched and unclenched his right hand. Once tight around her throat, it was now cramping from the effort. He’d held her hands high above her head, stretched out against the floor, because she hadn’t drunk anything. He’d relied on pure force, and it had made it different, not how he’d expected it. Normally they drift away before he takes them. This one hadn’t worked out that way. He had looked into her eyes as he squeezed, tried to see her final thoughts in them, and they’d been there. Confusion at first, then fear, before he saw what he had been chasing. Realisation: the knowledge of what she should have always known.

No one leaves...

neilNeil White was born and brought up around West Yorkshire. He left school at sixteen but studied for a law degree in his twenties, then started writing in 1994. He is now a lawyer by day, crime fiction writer by night. He lives with his wife and three children in Preston. Visit his website here and follow on Twitter @neilwhite1965

Also by Neil White:

 

Click to go to the Domino Killer page
The Domino Killer, published in hardback and ebook by Sphere in July 2015.

When a man is found beaten to death in a local Manchester park, Detective Constable Sam Parker is one of the investigating officers. Sam swiftly identifies the victim, but what at first looks like an open and shut case quickly starts to unravel when he realises that the victim’s fingerprints were found on a knife at another crime scene, a month earlier.

Meanwhile, Sam’s brother, Joe – a criminal defence lawyer in the city – comes face to face with a man whose very presence sends shockwaves through his life. Joe must confront the demons of his past as he struggles to come to terms with the darkness that this man represents.

Before long, Joe and Sam are in way over their heads, both sucked into a terrifying game of cat-and-mouse that threatens to change their lives for ever…”
Click to go to the Next To Die page

Joe Parker is Manchester’s most ingenious criminal defence lawyer.

Sam Parker is Manchester’s most tenacious murder detective.

Both bear the burden of the unsolved murder of their sister fifteen years earlier.

And both have a stake in a new series of murders that has shaken their city to its core.

Ronnie Bagley is accused of the murder of his girlfriend and baby, and claims that there’s only one lawyer he wants to defend him: Joe Parker. Little does Joe Parker know that Bagley is smarter than anyone has given him credit for, and soon Joe will find himself pitched against his own brother, Sam, in a race to outwit the most terrifying serial killer the city has ever seen. It isn’t long before Joe and Sam’s shared past comes crashing into the present in a pulse-pounding race to find out who is NEXT TO DIE

Click to go to the Beyond Evil page

“No one stayed long enough to get near the body. As soon as they looked, they backed away, screaming.”

DI Sheldon Brown has never recovered from finding the body of Alice Kenyon brutally murdered, naked and abandoned. And he’s never stopped pursuing his main suspect, hellraiser and lottery winner Billy Privett either. So when Billy is found dead in a hotel room, his face horrifically carved up, DI Brown’s obsession is rekindled.

Who killed the notorious millionaire in such a bloodthirsty way? With jaded lawyer Charlie Barker, who desperately needs to pick up the pieces of his own life, Sheldon will uncover a world of murder, drugs, long-buried secrets and a cult with a deadly conviction to their cause…


Click to go to the Cold Kill page

He’ll stuff your jaws till you can’t talk
He’ll bind your legs till you can’t walk
He’ll tie your hands till you can’t claw
And he’ll close your eyes so you see no more

When Jane Roberts is found dead in a woodland area, Detective Sergeant Laura McGanity is first on the scene. The body bears a chilling similarity to a woman – Deborah Corley – murdered three weeks earlier. Both have been stripped, strangled and defiled.

When reporter Jack Garrett starts digging for dirt on the notorious Whitcroft estate, he finds himself face-to-face with Jane’s father, local gangland boss Don Roberts, who won’t stop until justice is done. It seems that the two murdered women were linked in more ways than one and a dirty secret is about to surface that some would prefer stay buried.

As the killer circles once more, Jack and Laura must stop him before he strikes again. But his sights are set on his next victim and he’s watching Laura’s every move….

Click to go to the Dead Silent page

Digging for the truth can be fatal!

20 years ago, Britain was rocked by the strange disappearance of Claude Gilbert, after the beaten corpse of his wife was discovered hidden in the garden. Worst of all, scratches found on her makeshift coffin signal that the unthinkable took place – Nancy was buried alive.

Conspiracy theories say hotshot barrister and handsome TV presenter Gilbert murdered his wife and then killed himself, but with no body ever found, the mystery has remained unsolved. Until now! When Lancashire crime beat reporter Jack Garrett is contacted by someone claiming to be Gilbert’s girlfriend, and that he needs him to write the story proving his innocence, Jack eagerly leaps on the chance to clear a decades-old enigma.

But as Jack sets off on the trail of Gilbert – and the news scoop of his career – he quickly finds that the truth is stranger than the headlines. And as Jack chases the story, he and girlfriend Laura McGanity, attempting to earn her sergeant stripes in the local police force, quickly become pawns to a twisted individual with their own agenda!”

Click to go the Last Rites page

Parts of this book are so tense that I found myself hunched over it, desperate to find out what happened next, but fearful of what it might be…..a good plot with some compelling characters.
the bookbag.co.uk

When Luke Howarth is found fatally stabbed to death in his bed, suspicion falls on his girlfriend, Sarah Goode – missing since his murder. Just another crime of passion with a tragic end. Or is it?

Reporter Jack Garrett isn’t sure – especially when Sarah’s parents implore him to find their daughter.

But as he hunts for Sarah, he delves into the area’s troubled history and discovers that old rites may not be a thing of the past. Soon, Jack and Laura find themselves in mortal danger as they face an unhinged killer who is determined that they will pay with their lives…

 

Click to go to the Lost Souls page

A woman is found butchered on a Lancashire housing estate, her tongue and eyes brutally gouged out. Ritual murder or crime of passion?

Children are abducted and then returned to their families days later, unharmed but with no knowledge of where they have been – or who took them.

DC Laura McGanity, having relocated from London, quickly learns that life up north is far from peaceful. She needs to solve these mystifying cases – but keep the local police on side.

Her reporter boyfriend Jack Garrett – the reason for McGanity’s relocation – is back in his hometown and finds himself entangled in the two mysterious cases, his investigations revealing murky connections and sordid secrets.

But when Jack meets a man who ‘paints’ the future – prophecies of horrific events which he then puts onto canvas – it becomes terrifyingly clear that many people, including his own family, are in grave danger …

Click to go the Fallen Idols page
“A masterpiece. A fantastic book.
http://www.eurocrime.co.uk

A Premiership footballer is murdered on a busy London street, and a country is gripped by terror. Who lies behind this apparently motiveless killing – and who’s next?

Crime-beat reporter Jack Garrett is convinced that this is no celebrity stalker. Aided by DC Laura McGanity, desperately trying to juggle police life with motherhood, the trail leads them to Turners Fold, Lancashire – Jack’s home town.

What’s the connection between the recent assassination and the murder of a young girl there ten years before? Could it be that people are not all they seem – and will do anything to keep themselves in the spotlight?

Conspiracy, revenge and the high price of fame all combine in this stunning debut novel.

Steve Cavanagh- The Defence

defence

Eddie Flynn used to be a con artist. Then he became a lawyer. Turned out the two weren’t that different.It’s been over a year since Eddie vowed never to set foot in a courtroom again. But now he doesn’t have a choice. Olek Volchek, the infamous head of the Russian mafia in New York, has strapped a bomb to Eddie’s back and kidnapped his ten-year-old daughter, Amy. Eddie only has forty-eight hours to defend Volchek in an impossible murder trial – and win – if he wants to save his daughter. Under the scrutiny of the media and the FBI, Eddie must use his razor-sharp wit and every con-artist trick in the book to defend his ‘client’ and ensure Amy’s safety. With the timer on his back ticking away, can Eddie convince the jury of the impossible? Lose this case and he loses everything.

Okay, as they say over the water, here’s the thing. I don’t do legal thrillers. As a rule they bore me intensely, and I’ve dabbled in the genre with little success. I’m the type of gal who only watches half of Law and Order. The first half, thus for me, the interesting half, where crimes are perpetrated and people get attacked or murdered. I have little patience for posturing people in judicial wigs or designer suits, impressing no-one but themselves within the confines of the courtroom. BUT a strange thing has happened, nay a miracle, and Mr Cavanagh must be fully congratulated for this. He has written a legal thriller- yes, the alarm bells were ringing- but what’s more, a legal thriller that I read in practically one sitting. And loved. Yes, loved. Here’s why..

The absolute stand-out feature of this book is Cavanagh’s characterisation of sharp-talking but reluctant lawyer Eddie Flynn. Flynn is a wonderfully flawed man with a chequered past, Mafia connections and fundamental human weaknesses, but equally a man of great integrity who has a strong moral core, anxious to avenge the sins of his own former professional career as a lawyer, and to fairly extricate himself and others from the predicament he finds himself in. I thoroughly enjoyed how Cavanagh interweaved the less than honourable aspects of Flynn’s past life as a grifter, albeit to seek revenge on those that had wronged himself and his family, with the great personal cost to himself when he also manages to get a clearly guilty man exonerated from a heinous attack on a young woman (the upshot of this case being his withdrawal from his legal career). Finding himself in the clutches of a dangerous conspiracy to dispose of a witness, we are held on the edge of our seats as to how Flynn will thwart the baddies, and ensure the release of his daughter, whilst manipulating the due process of law, and calling in some favours from some less than savoury cohorts. Flynn completely carries the weight of the plot, with the reader believing in him consistently throughout, and with his humour, integrity and quick thinking, there was little to disabuse me of my feeling towards him as a thoroughly believable and likeable character. Equally, Cavanagh’s characterisation of the Russian crew was spot-on, presenting us with a host of great baddies for us to despise, but also within the Italian Mafia offshoot, giving us another set of notably bad but affectionately flawed men who Flynn calls upon to help in his hour of need.

The plot moved at breakneck speed with a breathless quality to the whole affair. As Flynn gets even further mired in the Russian conspiracy, there are real hold-your-breath moments, as the clock ticks down to exonerating Volchek without the potentially explosive events that Flynn’s failure could cause in the courtroom, and which could compromise the safety of his daughter. The book is well balanced between the unfurling court case, and the cat and mouse defence and prosecution of Volchek, and the events outside as we begin to see the depth of the plot against Flynn, and even Volchek himself, in a series of well-timed reveals that consistently wrong-foot the reader. It’s sharp, clever and a brilliantly executed thriller. And it’s not often I write those words. The Defence is a great debut, and here’s hoping there’s more of Eddie Flynn to come.

(With thanks to Orion for the ARC)

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