#FeverCity Blog Tour-Tim Baker- Review

FEVER CITY _ BLOG TOUR GRAPHICIt’s the next stop on the blog tour to mark the release of Fever City from debut crime novelist Tim Baker. I will be brutally honest and say that I did embark on the book with a certain amount of suspicion, as having read widely on everything JFK conspiracy related, I did wonder if anything new could be brought to the wealth of  theories that Kennedy’s assassination spawned, and the bravery of an author who would tread this well-worn path. I am incredibly pleased to report that Baker has achieved something quite special with this one, firmly dispelling any pre-conceptions that I held about the book. You’re intrigued now aren’t you?

Opening in the 1960’s, Nick Alston, a Los Angeles private investigator, is hired to find the kidnapped son of America’s richest and most hated man, Rex Bannister. With allusions to the infamous case of the Lindbergh kidnapping Alston soon finds himself intimately and dangerously entangled in the grasp of Bannister and his nefarious activities in the higher echelons of American society. Hastings, a mob hitman in search of redemption, is also on the trail but finds himself equally ensnared by a sinister cabal that spreads from the White House all the way to Dealey Plaza, and his own personal involvement in Kennedy’s fate. The story then pivots back and forth to 2014 where Alston’s son stumbles across evidence from JFK conspiracy buffs that just might link his father to the shot heard round the world…

aaApart from inserting a breath of fresh air into the whole mythology surrounding not only JFK’s demise and the agencies behind it, Baker brings into sharp focus a fine array of cultural references from the 60’s period, and the personalities that shone so bright in this golden age of American popular history. I liked the way that Baker explored the power hungry Joe Kennedy, the fragility of Monroe, the poignancy of Sal Mineo’s secret life, and the clear sighted and cold hearted scheming of Mafia figure Sam Giancana with his connections to the Rat Pack and JFK. I particularly enjoyed the way that Baker perfectly controlled the inclusion of these figures in the plot too, heightening the realism and feel of the plot, with some interesting revelations along the way that did not feel contrived nor far fetched. With three narratives, four time-lines, and a mixture of first and third person narration to juggle, it’s hard to believe that this is a debut, such was the control of all these elements within the book. As a book of significant length (in relation to most crime novels) I was also delighted by how long Baker managed to hold off the unfurling of revelations between the 60’s, and the contemporary storyline, in terms of the implications of Alston’s and Hastings’ personal involvement in the investigation of the kidnapping and the JFK assassination and its ramifications. I found my reading sped up considerably as I devoured the last few chapters at a pace, with a nice sense of ‘well, I wasn’t expecting that’ included.

I thought this was a genuinely terrific thriller; clever, well-researched and beautifully executed, as the action ebbed and flowed, keeping me on tenterhooks throught. There’s scheming, corruption, violence, and a strong sense of the personal cost that power, political envy and money can bring in its wake. The writing is sharp, dispassionate but endlessly engaging, and equally unsettling. In fact, the greatest compliment I can pay to this book is that I did feel an echo of James Ellroy along the way, not only with the assured inclusion of instantly recognisable figures, but also in some passages a slight mirroring of Ellroy’s punctilious and spare style, when the main protagonists slipped into stream of consciousness, or when a relevant social/cultural observation was needed to be made. A kind of revisiting of LA Confidential with a Texan twist…. Highly recommended.

(With thanks to Faber for the ARC)

Kevin Wignall- A Death In Sweden

oRDkfvQySUDan Hendricks is a man in need of a lifeline. A former CIA operative, he is now an agent for hire by foreign powers on the hunt for dangerous fugitives. It’s a lethal world at the best of times, and Dan knows his number is almost up. His next job could be his last—and his next job is his biggest yet.

The target sounds trackable enough: Jacques Fillon, who gave up his life trying to save a fellow passenger following a bus crash in northern Sweden. But the man was something of an enigma in this rural community, and his death exposes his greatest secret: Jacques Fillon never existed at all.

Dan is tasked with uncovering Fillon’s true identity—but can he do so before his own past catches up with him?

I have the ‘dubious’ pleasure of knowing Mr Wignall, so as he thrust a copy of this into my hand with an entirely understated personal dedication…

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how could I refuse to read and review it? And I did indeed ‘quite like it’.

Oh.

That’s not enough really is it?

You want to know more?

Okay.

With its intriguing opening centring on a bus crash in Sweden, Wignall then envelops us in a tale of a deniable CIA operative on the run, with a truly international feel as the story effortlessly pivots across different locations,  and many moments of betrayal and mortal peril. There is a tightness and simplicity to the writing that will utterly suck you in, the evidence of this being that I pretty much read this in one sitting, completely hooked on the pace and plot twists that come at you with an alarming rate. Wignall always demonstrates a heightened sense of the visual in his books, and there is a real screenwriter’s feel to the book throughout, which proves priceless to engaging the reader’s attention. I also liked the host of contradictions that lay within the character of Dan Hendricks himself, a man shaped by the less savoury activities of his professional life as a CIA operative with particularly dark abilities, but who when seeing former associates systematically eliminated to protect some dangerous secrets, exhibits a degree of nobility seemingly at odds with his dispassionate attitude to life and death. This raises some interesting questions on the issue of morality, and thus enables Wignall to raise the book above the normal narrative of a conspiracy thriller. The dialogue is sharp and punchy throughout (again adding to the overall pace of the book) and there’s a more than satisfying quotient of violence as the plot progresses, and the extent of the conspiracy against Hendricks unveils itself.

I quite liked it. Think you will too.

(With thanks to the author for the review copy)

 

 

 

Mari Hannah- The Silent Room

hannahA security van sets off for Durham prison, a disgraced Special Branch officer in the back. It never arrives. On route it is hijacked by armed men, the prisoner sprung. Suspended from duty on suspicion of aiding and abetting the audacious escape of his former boss, Detective Sergeant Matthew Ryan is locked out of the investigation. With a manhunt underway, Ryan is warned to stay away. Keen to preserve his career and prove his innocence, he backs off. But when the official investigation falls apart, under surveillance and with his life in danger, he goes dark, enlisting others in his quest to discover the truth. When the trail leads to the suspicious death of a Norwegian national, Ryan uncovers an international conspiracy that has claimed the lives of many…

There can be no greater source of trepidation for both author and reader alike, when they embark on a standalone novel, away from the comfort of an established and much loved series. Having built up a loyal following with her five book series featuring DCI Kate Daniels, Hannah has branched out and brings us The Silent Room, with a change of both cast and tempo. Rest assured, you will not be disappointed…

With its tense and action packed opening detailing the hold up of a prison van, and the liberation of its occupant, disgraced Special Branch officer, Jack Fenwick, Hannah quickly embroils us in a tale of deception and conspiracy that will make your teeth rattle. Eager to prove his erstwhile boss innocent, DS Matthew Ryan is tainted by his association with Fenwick, and sets about to find out the truth about Fenwick’s activities. Inevitably this puts Ryan in the spotlight of Internal Affairs, and the particular attention of Detective Superintendent Eloise O’Neil who is tasked not only to retrieve Fenwick, but to discover how deeply Ryan was involved in his ex-boss’ activities. With the help of retired Special Branch operative Grace Ellis and her shady right hand man Frank Newman, Ryan begins to uncover a far-reaching conspiracy that stretches beyond the UK, putting himself, and those closest to him, in danger.

Once again the strength and consistency of Hannah’s characterisation is clearly in evidence here, away from the security of her existing series. Each character is so perfectly defined and delineated that quite soon into the book you have the feeling that you have been familiar with them for some time, and each has an integral importance to the plot. Although the book contains at least two incredibly strong female characters, it was gratifying to see Hannah’s slight shift of focus onto having a more predominant male protagonist in the shape of Ryan, and the authenticity of his characterisation. Not only does his character consolidate the events that happen around him, but I particularly enjoyed the way that Hannah uses his interaction with other characters to reveal other aspects of his personality, for example the tenderness of his relationship with his sister, his sparring with O’Neil, and the distinctly maternal nature of his relationship with the formidable Grace Ellis. Likewise, we get the other side of the coin, with his fierce male loyalty to Fenwick, and his initial distrust of, and then grudging respect for, the mysterious Newman. Each character works exceptionally well in tandem with each other, and Hannah has also cleverly sowed the seeds for a potential reprisal of them in any future additions to this first outing.

Another stand out feature of the book is pace and control of the plotting, which quickly ensures that the reader is completely sucked in to the action, and the ramifications of the initial scene. The narrative is tight and the story segues between the North Est of England and further afield to Scandinavia there is no contrivance in evidence, and the arc of the plot feels entirely natural. There are some real moments of heart in mouth tension, and along with Hannah’s masking of some characters’ true intentions, the book throws up elements of surprise to unsettle the reader, that keep those pages a-turning. Her attention to location (so evident in the Kate Daniels series) is once again spot on, and as an ex-resident of the North East, it was particularly enjoyable to take a virtual tour back to some of my old haunts, with a real clarity of recognition, and the re-location of the action to Norway was equally enjoyable.

It’s more than gratifying to see another female author so assuredly stamp their mark on this particular area of the conspiracy thriller, so often the preserve of male writers, and The Silent Room will appeal to both genders equally. The control of characterisation and plotting ensures a more than satisfying read, and I for one, would be more than happy to meet these protagonists again. As much as I hate the liberal use of the word ‘unputdownable’, that is exactly what this is. Unputdownable.

(With thanks to Macmillan for the ARC)