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Raven Crime Reads

Criminally good reads…

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December 2017

Raven’s Yearly Round Up and Top 10 Crime Reads 2017

And so another year of ups, downs, swings and roundabouts draws to a close and, quite frankly, I’m rather glad to see the back of this one. Having had a whole barrelful of stress for most of the year, I’m now basking in a positive glow, and with the clear intention of working round the demands and frankly stupid hours of working and travelling, hoping that I can get my reading and reviewing back on track.

I have not yet experienced the life changing magic of getting myself organised,  but plans are afoot, and I march bravely into 2018 with a Dodo Pad, oodles of caffeine, leftover Christmas chocolate, some great forthcoming books, and a renewed sense of purpose.

Watch this space…

THAT WAS THE YEAR THAT WAS

As the events in the world at large have been as unerringly depressing as 2016, I’m sure many of us crime readers grabbed a book, shut out the world, and lost ourselves temporarily in slaughter, cruelty, and bloodshed- hmmm- art or life?! Anyway, this year has been a complete cracker, hence the need to extend my regular Top 5 of the year to a Top 10, and which could easily have  been a significantly higher number.

Once again, I have been taken on a voyage of discovery from continent to continent, to the past, to the present, to the future, to different cultures, but always witnessing people with the darkest intentions, and the sometimes noble, sometimes dark individuals who pursue them. And a thoroughly enjoyable year it was too, replete with splendid debuts, superb follow ups, and some surprising new discoveries.

And remember this little nugget from last year’s round-up…

“Resolution for 2017? Quoth the Raven. Nevermore. Not a single dopey domestic noir thriller will grace my blog in the next year.”

I only read one, and with some glee, I can announce J. P. Delaney- The Girl Before  was legitimately the worst book that I have read this year. With another slew of these girl/woman/wife/mother/sister/auntie books hitting us in 2018, I’m going to stick with this resolution! 

So with no further ado these are the chosen 10 books that have delighted and thrilled me the most. Just click on the jacket covers to go to the reviews, and don’t forget to add them to your wish-lists…

10.

9.

8.

 

7. 

6. 

5. 

4. 

3.

2.

 

1.

When I read this in the late summer I said it could quite possibly be my book of the year- and so it is.

It was just a completely wonderful emotional rollercoaster,  suffused with historical detail, and a totally authentic evocation of place. It is a hugely complex and challenging novel, addressing themes of war, religion, revenge, human connection and emotional strife.”

 

AND FINALLY- SOME SPECIAL THANKS…

Just wanted to end my round up to say thank you to my fellow bloggers, publishers and publicity assistants for feeding my reading habit, and being as supportive as ever in sharing my reviews as sporadic as they have been this year. Also for significantly increasing my wish-list, and my TBR mountain.  You’re the best.

Thanks also to the witty and good looking (!) band of authors who quite selflessly share my reviews of others, and have sent me some very heartening messages, and hilarious tweets this year…

Biggest thanks of all to Mari Hannah, who was a total rock at a time when I needed it the most, and although our cunning plans did not come to fruition, a big thank you for all your efforts- much appreciated!

I shall escape to the wild wastelands of the North. Be afraid… Ha!

Happy New Year everybody! 

 

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Getting That Blogging Groove Back (2)…Myers, Hirvonen, Tuomainen, Jonasson, and Sigurdardottir.

Right, eyes down and here we go again with the next instalment of my sorely neglected reviews. These are short, sweet, and to the point, as my propensity for rambling will return in the fullness of time, I’m sure…

 

First up one of my favourite deliciously dark authors, Benjamin Myers with These Darkening Days. Taking as his inspiration a real life crime case from the north of England, Myers once again lures us into the deepest disturbing psychological realms of his characters, delivering more than a few grim sucker punches along the way. A series of women become victims of a vicious assailant, plunging this close knit community into a miasma of suspicion and accusation.

I absolutely loved it. 

From the cynical world weariness of embittered reporter Roddy Mace, fighting off the temptation of the demon drink, to the reappearance of fastidious, OCD suffering detective James Brindle, and a cornucopia of dislikeable victims and suspects along the way, Myers (as in previous books) draws us in, shakes us up, and then spits us out the other end slightly soiled by our reading experience, but guiltily satisfied by it too. As always the book is suffused by Myers strange mix of sometimes lyrical, oftentimes unerringly brutal imagery of the natural environment against which his characters roil, fight, and will to survive.

Perfection. 

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Next we go the quirky, dry-humoured latest offering from Finnish author, Antti Tuomainen in the shape of The Man Who Died, a marked diversion in style from the intensely emotive, and lyrically profound psychological novels that we normally associate him with. Other reviewers have drawn comparison with Fargo, but I was strongly propelled back in time to the devilish Tales of The Unexpected by Roald Dahl, coupled with the brilliantly black humour of one of my favourite books ever, ever, Beyond The Great Indoors by Ingvar Ambjornsen. Tuomainen’s unlikely protagonist, Jaako Kaunismaa takes us on a surreal journey in rural Finland of tracking down his murderer whilst fighting the clutches of death by poisoning, to the sheer cutthroat mentality of competing mushroom harvesting businesses, instances of potential death by samurai sword, and exceptionally scheming women.

It’s all a bit mad, but in a good way, and with Tuomainen’s natural propensity to draw his reader into his exploration of the essence of humanity, just from a slightly different angle, his lightness of touch, and manipulation of absurdity work a treat. Who could possibly know that the world of mushroom growing was such a hotbed of evil intentions? Highly recommended. 

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Staying with Finland, I can confidently say that When Time Runs Out by Elina Hirvonen is champing for a place in my top five of the year. I was absolutely mesmerised by the pure intensity and sensitivity of one family’s turmoil in the wake of a mass shooting. With shades of We Need To Talk About Kevin, Hirvonen meticulously and stealthily portrays the increasing emotional dislocation of a family, over a period of time, to the devastating effects of this inability for them to communicate and connect on an emotional level.

Hirvonen broadens the sweep of the book even further with incisive comment on global human crises, and the ravaging of the environment which really engaged me and enraged me, but was wonderfully unflinching and truthful in its depiction. I am already recommending this left, right and centre, thrilled by its power as both a clear sighted narrative of familial breakdown, but also of the larger issues it encompasses in a comparatively condensed read.

Superb.   

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We’ll go for an Icelandic head-to-head now with Ragnar Jonasson- Whiteout and Lilja Sigurdardottir- Snare, the former being a continuation of the very successful series featuring policeman Ari Thor, and the latter the starting point of the Reykjavik Noir Trilogy.

Ragnar Jonasson’s quality as a crime writer need no further commendation from me, but truthfully, I would say that this has been my favourite of the series to date. I found the writing wonderfully understated, and the whole book exuded an air of English Gothic fiction, with women hurling themselves from cliffs, and the sinister backdrop of the all-seeing lighthouse, compounded by the revelations of very dark pernicious behaviour indeed. I found it tense, involving, and as usual there was a great harmony between the intensity of the criminal investigation itself, and the playing out of Ari’s domestic situation, and his eagerness to progress in his police career.   

Snare proved a curious mix for me, as my overriding feeling that this was almost two books running parallel to each other, with a gripping story of drug running, running alongside a slower Borgen-esque feeling of financial impropriety, and double dealing. I’ll be honest, and say that I didn’t take to the latter thread as much as the former, finding it a little turgid against the relative excitement of the drug smuggling narrative, and although I was slightly questioning of the veracity of single parent Sonja’s involvement in drug running, this was certainly the more compelling of the two storylines, and led to some real heart in the mouth moments. I also enjoyed playing witness to the touchingly sentimental ‘other’ life of customs officer Bragi, whose game of cat and mouse with Sonja was another enjoyable strand of the book. However, the emotional handwringing of Sonja’s romantic involvement with Agla, the bank executive under investigation, became increasingly tiresome, but cleverly the seemingly anodyne ending of the book must signpost further developments for the second part of the trilogy. A little unsure, but curious, and intrigued to see how the story progresses in the next instalment.  

 

(With thanks to Moth Publishing for These Darkening Days, Bonnier Zaffre for When Time Runs Out, and Orenda Books for The Man Who Died, Whiteout and Snare

 

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