Jackson, DaveAnd so to Raven Crime Reads for the next stop on the blog tour marking the release of David Jackson’s fifth book, A Tapping At My Door. With the previous books all being set in the jolly old U. S. of A, Jackson has stayed closer to home with this one, setting it in his native city of Liverpool. In a special guest post, the author reflects on some of the locations used in this compelling new thriller…

My Liverpool

dj“The title chosen for this blog post is ‘My Liverpool’, but it could equally be called ‘Cody’s Liverpool’, as there’s a curious overlap between the places I know well and the locations used in ‘A Tapping at My Door’!

Stoneycroft

The novel opens in a house in Stoneycroft, about 3 or 4 miles from the city centre. This was actually the first house I bought. It was nothing special, but it got me on the property ladder. At that time I had no thoughts of becoming a novelist!

Bold Street

When we first meet Cody, he’s working undercover as a busker at the bottom of Bold Street. At the time of writing, there was a massive Waterstones here. This was closed down a few months later, so I had to go back and rewrite the chapter. From this location, we follow Cody on a foot pursuit through Central Station and into Clayton Square.

Stanley Road, Kirkdale

Cody’s unit, the Major Incident Team, is housed in the police station here in this deprived area of Liverpool. It is actually situated next to a funeral parlour, hence the bit in the novel about the locals joking that it’s the only way the homicide detectives can find a dead body.

Kensington

libThe investigation takes Cody to this residential area just outside the city centre. In the book, he remembers visiting the library here as a kid, with the Francis Bacon quote above the library door: ‘Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man.’ Funny that, because I remember exactly the same things from when I was a kid.

Rodney Street

As mentioned in the novel, Rodney Street is sometimes referred to as the Harley Street of the north, with its doctors, dentists, etc. Cody rents a flat above a dental practice here. Believe it or not, it’s based on a place in which I once lived on the same street. The buildings are huge, Georgian town houses, with lots of story potential, as will become apparent in the series.

Fairfield

Not far from Kensington is Fairfield, which is where Cody’s family lives. This is where I was born, and the Cody household is loosely based on what I can remember of our own place all those years ago. Running between Kensington and Fairfield is Sheil Road, close to another house I lived in, and the location for another murder in the novel.

Pubs: Ye Cracke, The Philharmonic, The Beehive

250px-YeCrackeLiverpoolOMI have had many pints of beer in many of the pubs in Liverpool, and a few of these are described in the book. Ye Cracke is a tiny watering hole, renowned as the place that John Lennon used to drink. Just around the corner from here is the building that used to be the grammar school attended by Paul McCartney, George Harrison and yours truly (although I was there much later!) By contrast, the Philharmonic pub just down the road is a huge establishment, famous for its ornate urinals! Another pub I spent some time in is The Beehive, where Cody has a meeting with Dobson the journalist.

Hope Street

I love Hope Street. Aptly named, it connects the city’s two cathedrals. It’s also home to the Everyman Theatre and a number of great restaurants. One of these – the London Carriage Works – is where Cody goes to confront the newspaper editor.

Brownlow Hill

This runs from town up through the university campus. At its bottom end is the famous Adelphi Hotel, and the car park behind this forms another location for the book.

And finally …

There is one other Liverpool landmark I’d like to talk about, but can’t, as it plays a key role in the novel’s finale. You’ll just have to read the book to find out more!”

David Jackson is the author of a series of crime thrillers featuring New York Detective Callum Doyle. His debut novel, Pariah, was Highly Commended in the Crime Writers’ Association Debut Dagger Awards. When not writing fiction, David spends his time as a lecturer in a university science department. He also gives occasional workshops on creative writing. Follow the author on Twitter @Author_Dave.

RAVEN REVIEWS:

dj

I think you can probably tell from my previous reviews for Pariah The Helper , Marked and Cry Baby that I am rather keen on the oeuvre of Mr Jackson, and this quartet of New York set thrillers were filled with twists, humour and a reckless, but all the more endearing, police protagonist, Detective Callum Doyle. After a small hiatus, Jackson returns to the world of the crime thriller, with a new setting, new characters, and the temptation of a deliciously dark and compelling investigation…

Beginning with an epigraph from The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe (one extra point allocated by this reviewer) reflecting the title of the book, we are immediately plunged into a nerve shredding opening, to which we must thank Mr Jackson for giving all us single ladies the right heebie jeebies. Disturbed by a tapping at her back door, and in a move as stupid as going to the basement in a horror film, Terri Latham goes to investigate finding a raven is responsible for the noise. Then a killer strikes, thus killing two birds with one stone (sorry couldn’t resist that one, and also the consequent loss of formerly allocated point for crimes against ravens). When Latham’s murder is investigated further, events from her recent past lead to the revisiting of a contentious case centred on police brutality. Tasked with uncovering a killer is DS Nathan Cody, a former undercover operative carrying the scars of an undercover mission gone wrong,  but can Cody keep his head as the pressure mounts, and the body count begins to rise…

You know those real read-in-one-sitting thrillers, where little short of impending starvation or natural disaster would move you from the sofa? Yep, this is one of those. Although at first glance, you could be mistaken for thinking that this was an all too familiar plot of weirdo on rampage with twisted agenda, versus damaged cop, Jackson adds a certain verve to the whole affair as he sucks us in deeper to the tormented worlds of his protagonists. Cody is a hugely empathetic character, and as his personal demons are slowly revealed his stock rises in the whole narrative arc. You have an unerring sense of the devil on his shoulder, but this is counterbalanced well by the curious mix of bravado, and at times deep self-questioning, that Jackson imbues into his character. Less successful for me initially (there was a slight look to the heavens) was the slightly awkward scenario of him being partnered up with a former lover, but my fears were assuaged as DC Megan Webley established herself quickly as acutely necessary to the unfolding of Cody’s story. I also loved his boss, DCI Stella Blunt who threatened to ride roughshod over everyone on her sporadic appearances in the plot, with an incomparable mix of steel underscored by a certain softness.

As the book races to a thrilling denouement with the killer’s motivations at last revealed, it is apt that Jackson draws on two distinctly recognisable facets of Liverpool and Liverpudlian history to bring the story to a close. I always enjoy it when British authors write so realistically and recognisably about their own stamping grounds, as in the books of Mari Hannah with the North East, David Mark with Hull, and fellow Liverpudlian Kevin Sampson for example. Throughout the book, Jackson takes us on an affectionate but not completely misty-eyed, trip through the familiar streets of his native city, and the city takes a role as a separate character in the book. The author is refreshingly disinclined to paint too rosy a picture of this city with its mixture of recognisable growth set against the curse of inner city deprivation, and he achieves this balance perfectly.

I rather enjoyed this one as you can tell, as a well-executed thriller, with plenty of scope and a firm foundation for a projected series. Quoth the Raven- it’s really rather good…

Catch up with or follow the rest of the blog tour here:

1 A Tapping at my Door Blog Banner FINAL- use this one

 

 

 

Advertisements